What We Fund

Supporting Mobilization, Organizing, Advocacy, Resistance, Healing, Inspiration and Liberation

We Fund Groups That Are:

  • People of Color Led – Groups, organizations and coalitions whose core leadership and primary decision makers identify as BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color), and whose other identities may be women, LGBTQ+, youth, returning citizens, immigrants, people with disabilities, or excluded workers who have historically faced challenges securing traditional forms of funding.

  • Focused on DC Residents – Work that is organized and operated within the District of Columbia and primarily impacts DC residents of color or former residents who have been displaced or gentrified out of the city.

  • Social Justice Centered – Projects that amplify the leadership and voices of those directly-affected by the issues and needs being addressed. Work that takes action to create equitable outcomes and transfers power and resources to directly-affected communities. Approaches that tackle root problems by engaging affected communities to find solutions, organize against oppression of all kinds, and create mechanisms for transformational change.

  • Coalition Driven – In addition to funding individual organizations or projects, we support coalitions of three groups or more who are BIPOC led and collaborating to amplify their power.

*Groups do not need to be a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization to apply.

We do not fund:

  • Direct service programs that are not linked to organizing, advocacy or policy change.

  • Regional organizations/projects that do not primarily impact DC residents.

  • Anyone who has received a grant through a Fall / Spring grant cycle within the last 12 months. For example, groups that receive funding in the Fall of one year will not be eligible to reapply until the Fall of the next year.

Examples:

We will most likely fund:

  • A student organizing group that may partner with a white-led nonprofit solely as a fiscal agent, but whose strategic decisions are made by a leadership council of BIPOC identifying youth.

  • A cancel rent campaign whose organization members are residents who live in Ward 7 and former residents who have had to relocate to Prince George’s County.

  • A newly formed coalition organizing resources to meet basic needs for excluded workers and their families, in mutual aid, as part of a long-term community building strategy.

  • A healing collective curated by people who identify as BIPOC that creates healing circles for organizers of color throughout the city.

We probably won’t fund:

  • A white-led economic policy nonprofit with a majority white-board in which a community outreach project is facilitated by staff of color who do not have organizational decision making power.

  • A Virginia statewide organization, with a chapter in Northern Virginia who is organizing an affordable housing campaign with a few members who are DC residents.

  • A food pantry project, organized by a neighborhood church, to solely feed their food insecure members.

  • An afterschool program that offers recreation and sports for youth.